nevver:

The 100 Most Beautiful Words in English nevver:

The 100 Most Beautiful Words in English

Roman Ondak - From the series Observations (1995)

(via katepulley)

explore-blog:

Legendary curator Hans Ulrich Obrist, known for his impossibly fast pace, goes on a 24-hour studio tour of LA’s most influential artists. Obrist’s Do It: The Compendium, which collects 20 years of famous artists’ instructions for art anyone can make, is a must-read.

i did all this to make, now i don’t make

There was a question i struggled with when debating whether to go to art school or not, i knew i wanted to continue to make art but i didn’t really understand my motivation for it. In hindsight i doubt there was much of a motivation, in a childish and naieve outlook on it i worried that it was a sensation of being lost and unhappy that spurred the want to create on. In anticipation of life moving on and things changing i figured that those would have little impact anymore and would that need to create something  fizzle out and leave me even more uncertain of a direction.

Every 20 something year old i know has no idea what they want from life and isn’t entirely sure that what they chose to spend the past few years doing is what they want to spend further ones pursuing. This only trips us up because we were given to understand we had to have a life plan together by now, our parents were married, settled, had careers or at least jobs they’d committed to.

There is the instilled notion we have to have it all figured out, which at some point we all realise is a bit unrealistic. The only way in which i’ve counteracted the strong disappointment of not having my shit together is that i’ll do something that makes me happy until it doesn’t. Whatever that is will undoubtedly through up problems and we’ll deal with them with as much preparation as possible and where not, the best we can in that situation. 

Nostalgia and summing up of getting a grown up perspective on living aside, i can’t recall being more lost and not continuely, but through chronic episodes, than i have been throughout the last year. I am ever thankful there hasn’t been the self indulgent time of day to wallow in it. There is nothing worse than standing back and merely acknowledging your own capacity to find life incomprehensible at that point in time. It completely separates you from any process of processing or actioning. If by some chance you make it back to forming a plan of action it only mounts the pressure of the new start of things are going to be better once this mere event has been put in motion. 

After six months of living alone, almost a year of not knowing what was going to happen next, constantly digging myself out of a financial hole, and being single for 8 months i did decide my own company at the end of a long day, that quite often was made up of my own company, was enough. I got a cat. When he came back to mine i sat down that evening and genuinely mused that i needed nothing else. I had everything that could possibly make me happy. 

This is what brings me back to my original point, everything that’s happened in the past year has been a move forward, employment, relationships, housing, experience, friendships. With every move forward i’ve created less and less work. Life has offered me distractions and i for no moment think that any of my unhappiness and lack of direction contributed to an ability to create, however i do believe it was the means to working out a plan of action that didn’t have to be a resolution to everything. They were the capacity to get through to the next day and deal with the next set of circumstances. Now i am aware that if i don’t make the same time i did then, for the process of understanding and working through life via the medium of making, i won’t be able to find a way of understanding and processing these new circumstances. Which may hold far fewer issues but are still an essential aspect to the whole body of existence and the other half of a life lived. 

“A saint’s bones, for instance, in Medieval Latin, were ‘translated’ into the bejeweled receptacle of their reliquary. As for ourselves, aren’t we continuously translating our own thoughts, our own fears and desires: transferring them from one point, one level of apprehension, to another? Call it music, poetry, prayer. Whatever, it’s within our very nature, it would seem, to reiterate experience…”
— Gustaf Sobin, Luminous Debris (via invisiblestories)
“Authenticity comes from a single faithfulness: that to the ambiguity of experience.”
— John Berger (via invisiblestories)
I work on mirrors as a surface all the time, so much so I’m largely oblivious to my own reflection it’s difficult to avoid that physical interpretation when I’m trying to document the work conveyed on that mirrors surface I work on mirrors as a surface all the time, so much so I’m largely oblivious to my own reflection it’s difficult to avoid that physical interpretation when I’m trying to document the work conveyed on that mirrors surface I work on mirrors as a surface all the time, so much so I’m largely oblivious to my own reflection it’s difficult to avoid that physical interpretation when I’m trying to document the work conveyed on that mirrors surface

I work on mirrors as a surface all the time, so much so I’m largely oblivious to my own reflection it’s difficult to avoid that physical interpretation when I’m trying to document the work conveyed on that mirrors surface

visual-poetry:

»self-described and self-defined« by joseph kosuth (+)

The worst thing you do when you think is lie — you can make up reasons that are not true for the things that you did, and what you’re trying to do as a creative person is surprise yourself — find out who you really are, and try not to lie, try to tell the truth all the time. And the only way to do this is by being very active and very emotional, and get it out of yourself — making things that you hate and things that you love, you write about these then, intensely. When it’s over, then you can think about it; then you can look, it works or it doesn’t work, something is missing here. And, if something is missing, then you go back and reemotionalize that part, so it’s all of a piece.

But thinking is to be a corrective in our life — it’s not supposed to be a center of our life. Living is supposed to be the center of our life, being is supposed to be the center — with correctives around, which hold us like the skin holds our blood and our flesh in. But our skin is not a way of life — the way of living is the blood pumping through our veins, the ability to sense and to feel and to know. And the intellect doesn’t help you very much there — you should get on with the business of living.

A conversation with Ray Bradbury, born on August 22, 1920. (via explore-blog)

(via explore-blog)

guardian:

Founded in 1937, Mass Observation’s aim was to record the ordinary lives of ordinary people in order to counteract the stereotypes of the same that held sway in the British media of the time. Armies of volunteers interviewed people about their lives and opinions.
Photographers such as Humphrey Spender were dispatched to make visual records of British communities. Though not in fact used at the time, Spender’s images are now recognised as an important part of the Mass Observation archive. This photograph is from the series Bolton Worktown, 1937. guardian:

Founded in 1937, Mass Observation’s aim was to record the ordinary lives of ordinary people in order to counteract the stereotypes of the same that held sway in the British media of the time. Armies of volunteers interviewed people about their lives and opinions.
Photographers such as Humphrey Spender were dispatched to make visual records of British communities. Though not in fact used at the time, Spender’s images are now recognised as an important part of the Mass Observation archive. This photograph is from the series Bolton Worktown, 1937. guardian:

Founded in 1937, Mass Observation’s aim was to record the ordinary lives of ordinary people in order to counteract the stereotypes of the same that held sway in the British media of the time. Armies of volunteers interviewed people about their lives and opinions.
Photographers such as Humphrey Spender were dispatched to make visual records of British communities. Though not in fact used at the time, Spender’s images are now recognised as an important part of the Mass Observation archive. This photograph is from the series Bolton Worktown, 1937. guardian:

Founded in 1937, Mass Observation’s aim was to record the ordinary lives of ordinary people in order to counteract the stereotypes of the same that held sway in the British media of the time. Armies of volunteers interviewed people about their lives and opinions.
Photographers such as Humphrey Spender were dispatched to make visual records of British communities. Though not in fact used at the time, Spender’s images are now recognised as an important part of the Mass Observation archive. This photograph is from the series Bolton Worktown, 1937. guardian:

Founded in 1937, Mass Observation’s aim was to record the ordinary lives of ordinary people in order to counteract the stereotypes of the same that held sway in the British media of the time. Armies of volunteers interviewed people about their lives and opinions.
Photographers such as Humphrey Spender were dispatched to make visual records of British communities. Though not in fact used at the time, Spender’s images are now recognised as an important part of the Mass Observation archive. This photograph is from the series Bolton Worktown, 1937.

guardian:

Founded in 1937, Mass Observation’s aim was to record the ordinary lives of ordinary people in order to counteract the stereotypes of the same that held sway in the British media of the time. Armies of volunteers interviewed people about their lives and opinions.

Photographers such as Humphrey Spender were dispatched to make visual records of British communities. Though not in fact used at the time, Spender’s images are now recognised as an important part of the Mass Observation archive. This photograph is from the series Bolton Worktown, 1937.